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he biggest rule of lighting in retail seems to be too much is never enough. Any less, and it’s not enough, according to industry professionals across the country.

Greg Cain, director of retail sales and distribution at Zoo Atlanta, said even when you think you have enough light, you still might not. “Enough is simply not enough. You almost cannot have enough lighting, ever,” he said.

No matter how small the store, or how much natural light you get from a forgiving sun location, that doesn’t mean you should underestimate how much lighting can help in your quest to attract customers.

Greg Cain, the director of retail sales and distribution at Zoo Atlanta, said even when you think you have enough light, you still might not.

“Enough is simply not enough,” he said. “You almost cannot have enough lighting, ever,” he said.

Michael Davis, the retail sales manager and buyer at the Cameron Park Zoo in Waco, Texas, said the biggest mistake you can make in terms of lighting is allowing burned out bulbs to darken your store. However, a close second, he said, is voluntarily blocking natural light that can brighten your store, highlight your merchandise and not cost you a dime in electric bills.

“I hate when stores block their windows or put up excessive advertising on the windows,” he said. “Let the light in!”

Melissa Rosevear, director of guest services at the Lehigh Valley Zoo in Allentown, Pa., said stores should make as much use of natural light as they can.

“Lighting a store well begins with welcoming natural sunlight into the retail space,” she said. “You cannot go wrong with natural light.┬áIt encourages a warm and comfortable environment.”

Amy Luhr, guest relations manager at the Austin (Texas) Zoo and Animal Sanctuary, is also in charge of the zoo’s gift shop and knows that light is key to making sales.

“Just not being bright enough,” Luhr said about mistakes she’s seen at retail locations. “We’re always making sure we have ours as bright as we can make it.” – M.S.







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